Spice-rubbed pan-fried New York strip steak

Source: Fine Cooking #33 (also at FineCooking.com)

I love finding spice-rubbed steak recipes, because they’re easy and I generally have all the ingredients (except the meat). Throw in a generous side of veggies, and you have a great weekday or simple weekend meal.

This spice rub has some smokiness from the cumin, and I used smoked paprika for additional smokiness. Add some cinnamon for sweetness and oregano for some herbiness, and you have a nicely rounded rub.

I used the rub on my new favourite steak, the New York stip. I find this cut is the perfect balance between tenderness and price. Much less expensive than filet mignon and ribeye, but still tender and juicy if seared quickly to a medium-rare. It’s hard to give a time guideline because it depends entirely on the thickness of the steaks. My best recommendation is to experiment and learn to gauge doneness by touch.

I served the steak alongside roasted root vegetables (a mix of carrots, parsnips and turnips), which are so abundant at this time of the year.

Spice-rubbed New York strip steak with roasted root vegetables
Spice-rubbed New York strip steak with roasted root vegetables

Steak au poivre with New York strip

Source: Fine Cooking #31 (also at FineCooking.com)

The exploration into cuts of beef continues. Over the last couple weeks, I experimented with ribeye and flank steak.

This week I turn to the relatively inexpensive New York strip steak (or simply, strip steak). The New York strip is a close relative to the T-bone steak… if you remove the piece of tenderloin and the bone from the T-bone steak, you’re left with the New York strip steak.

I thought I would stick to a simple but classic preparation: steak au poivre. The steak is coated with salt and coarsely ground, and fried in a hot cast-iron pan. My steaks were not very thick, so I had to be careful not to overcook.

While the steaks rested, I prepared a simple red wine reduction in the same cast-iron pan, incorporating any browned bits stuck to the pan. I served the steak with roasted fennel.

Compared to the ribeye from last week, the ribeye is a more tender cut of meat. But for the price difference, I’d choose the New York strip for everyday meals. If you want to impress, grab the ribeye… but if you’re watching the budget, you’ll be just as happy with New York strip steak.

New York strip steak au poivre with roasted fennel
New York strip steak au poivre with roasted fennel

Pan-seared ribeye steak with pan-roasted carrots

Source: Fine Cooking #80 (also at FineCooking.com) and Fine Cooking #85 (also at FineCooking.com)

My exploration of cuts of beef continues with the ribeye steak. (Last week was flank steak.)

Ribeye steak is not a cheap cut, but it’s a very tender and flavourful cut. It lends itself well to pan-frying or grilling. Make sure you get thick steaks… if they’re too thin, they’ll overcook and you’ll be disappointed. Aim for at least 1-inch thick steaks.

The preparation I made involved a simple rub of ground anise, fresh rosemary, salt and pepper. I grilled them to medium-rare in a cast-iron pan.

I served the steaks with pan-roasted carrots. These almost outshone the steaks… they’re a real keeper! Again, super-simple… start by browning them in a frying pan with some maple syrup, salt and pepper, then finish in the oven (but not overcooked… they should stay quite toothy).

This meal comes together very easily. Start with the carrots, and once they’re in the oven, concentrate on cooking the steaks. Enjoy!

Ribeye steaks searing in a cast-iron pan
Ribeye steaks searing in a cast-iron pan
Pan-seared ribeye steak with pan-roasted carrots
Pan-seared ribeye steak with pan-roasted carrots